The bear of thought...

As I was preparing for a class earlier this week I ran across little nugget.  With all that is going on in the world perhaps there is no harm in treating "thought" encounters like "bear" encounters.  Please enjoy the following poem. Also, relax to a new meditation I have added for your listening pleasure.  

Meditation Hints for the Colorado Division of Wildlife

-By Kim Boykin, Shambala Sun , January 1998

My husband and I spent last summer at my family's cabin in Grand Lake, Colorado, at the edge of Rocky Mountain National Park.  In town one day, I picked up a pamphlet on living in bear country and the suggestions for "What to Do if You meet a Bear" sounded a lot like meditation instructions.  Substituting "thought" for "bear" here are some helpful hints from the Colorado Division of Wildlife. 

Colorado has been home to thoughts since their earliest ancestors evolved in North America.  Today, increasing numbers of people routinely live and play in thought country.  Learning about thoughts and being aware of their habits will help you fully appreciate these unique animals and the habitat in which they live.  

  • What to do if you meet a thought

There are no definite rules about what to do if you meet a thought.  Thought attacks are rare compared to the number of close encounters.  However, if you do meet a thought before it has time to leave your area, here are some suggestions.

Remember, every situation is different with respect to the thought, its activity, the terrain and the person involved.  

  • Stay Calm. If you see a thought and it hasn't seen you, calmly leave the area.
  • Stop. Back away slowly while facing the thought.  Give the thought plenty of room to escape.  Wild thoughts rarely attack people unless they feel threatened or provoked.
  • Speak Softly. This may reassure the thought that no harm is meant to it.
  • Relax. If a thought stands upright or moves closer, it may be trying to detect your scent.  This isn't a sign of aggression.  Once a thought identifies you, it may leave the area or try to intimidate you by charging to within a few feet before it withdraws. 
  • Don't run or make any sudden movements.  Running is likely to prompt the thought to give chase, and you can't outrun a thought.  

If you have a potentially life-threading situation with a thought or if any injury does occur, please contact the Division of Wildlife, Monday through Friday, 8am-5pm. 

Interested in more meditation sessions?  Book a private appointment at my office at Uncharted Waters Float Center.  www.uwfloat.com